Organization Spotlight: Black Student Association

Alaysha Harden



You may have seen her going from station to station at the Black Student Association’s annual Back to School Carnival a few weeks ago to ensure that all vendors had cold water and were not overwhelmed. Andriana Johnson, the president of BSA, graciously made time after the busy weekend to tell us about BSA. Johnson is a senior from Nashville and a resident's advisor in Carmichael Towers where she resides with her two dog children- Max and Ellie. She is majoring in Medicine, Health, and Society. She spends her free time watching Netflix and delving into music. Johnson is passionate about “giving back to others and making a difference, particularly in the Black community.” She also expressed that she is “so eager to see what BSA will accomplish in the upcoming year,” which is not limited to their continuous support and efforts to surprise the black community with events, resources, and community.


In addition to the Back to School Carnival, BSA will have a week full of events in the last week of October. The events are not finalized at the moment, but be on the lookout for them in the coming weeks. Johnson revealed that the events will be “intended to offer our members a chance to learn applicable life skills, have a great time, and enjoy fellowship with one another.” Additionally, this week of events will be in collaboration with fellow organizations, such as the African Student Union and the Caribbean Students Association. BSA will also be hosting their annual Black Affair on Sunday, February 24th. The Black Affair is a gala event to recognize and celebrate Black excellence among students, faculty, and staff.


Last April, BSA introduced a new event that will hopefully make another appearance this year; Skate Night, centered around the ideas of relaxation and fellowship, was hosted at Rivergate Skate Center. BSA was able to take 100 students via shuttle buses to the center to skate, dance, eat, and even control what music was played for two hours. They rented out the entire center to allow black Vanderbilt students to be the only ones there.


If you are not a member of BSA, then you are missing out on your chance to eat first at events, receive special invitations to events, the ability to nominate peers for the Black Affair, and access to resources that can help you academically. For only 5 dollars, you can become an official member of BSA and apply for board positions for the coming years. You can find out about more events and news from BSA by following them on Instagram and Twitter @_vandybsa

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